ENGAGE, EQUIP, & EMPOWER: Black History Month Lesson Ideas

mbwThe function of education is to teach one to think intensively and to think critically. Intelligence plus character – that is the goal of true education. – Martin Luther King Jr.

February is Black History Month. This blog contains links to some of my favorite ideas and books to use when designing lesson plans to celebrate and learn at the same time.

First, here is a round up of some great resources from Teachers Pay Teachers.

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Designed with third and fourth graders in mind, this biographies resource includes materials for students to use while conducting research, as well as materials for the presentation of their final writing piece, in a Biography Lapbook. Click HERE to find this product, Biography Lapbook!

 

 

bhmLooking for some new and fresh activities for Black History Month? This pack includes writing, reading, vocabulary, crafts, and more! Click HERE to find this product Black History Month Activities!

 

 

 

Below are a few FABULOUS books to read to students during Black History Month. Click on any image to order from my Amazon site.

The following links are affiliate links to Amazon. If you choose to make a purchase, I do receive a small commission. 

Happy Teaching!

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ENGAGE, EQUIP, & EMPOWER: Teaching about Elizabeth Blackwell

elizabeth-blackwell-3Looking for an interesting topic to discuss next week in class? How about teaching students about the first woman to ever graduate from medical school “way back when” on January 23rd of 1849?

Elizabeth Blackwell was the first woman to receive a M.D. degree from an American medical school. Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell and colleagues founded the New York Infirmary for Women and Children. Read more about this amazing woman here.

One easy way to engage students in a lesson about Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell is to watch a quick intro video about her. Who Says Women Can’t Be Doctors: The Story of Elizabeth Blackwell — Weston Woods

You can also find a read aloud of Scholastic’s book here: Tami Reads “Who Says Women Can’t Be Doctors? The Story of Elizabeth Blackwell” By: Tanya Lee Stone

For K-3 students, engage them in meaningful, thoughtful discussions about courage and self-confidence. You can tie the discussion to a read aloud of Amazing Grace by Mary Hoffman. Students can discuss how both the character and Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell displayed courage and self-confidence. Empower students by having them write about Dr. Blackwell and how they can apply her example to their own lives!

Click here to see lesson plan ideas!

For 4th – 6th grade here is a link to a TpT resource about Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell.

Happy Teaching!

 

 

Dream Big. . .Just Like King!

This post is a “reblog” from several years ago. This is still one of the BEST lessons I ever taught in the classroom!

mrswilsonsclass

130823150654-01-color-march-on-washington-restricted-horizontal-galleryEvery teacher has days when they reflect on a lesson and think, “Wow, that did not work out like I expected.” Then there are the days when everything clicks. The students respond in amazing ways and you know that you hit a “sweet” spot. Today was one of those “sweet” spot days!

In honor of the upcoming Martin Luther King Holiday, we conducted a close read text about his life and his most famous speech. We started the class by dreaming. Yes, we were dreaming. I asked students to think about what their BIG dream would be for our country or even our world. I was amazed at their answers!

After discussing their dreams, I introduced someone else who had BIG dreams, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The students watched this mini-bio about Dr. King.

The class conducted their close read and responded to the text through a series of…

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Education Class: Multi-Sensory Magic

MS.pngUsing multi-sensory instructional techniques is not new. We have done it for years. Think about the song “I’m a Little Teapot.” I can always remember that song because I can still do the motions with it. That is multi-sensory instruction!

My son is dyslexic. For the past 2 years, he has received multi-sensory language instruction therapy. When he was in the 7th grade, he only read at a 2.4 grade-level equivalency. He is now a 9th grader. In December of 2017, his grade-level reading equivalency was 8.3!!! This multi-sensory, systematic approach is the ONLY thing that has worked for him. I am incorporating more and more of this instructional approach into my own work with struggling readers.

“Multisensory teaching isn’t just limited to reading and listening. Instead, it tries to use all of the senses. Every lesson won’t use all of a child’s senses (taste, smell, touch, sight, hearing and movement). But in most multisensory lessons, students engage with the material in more than one way.” -understood.org

Read More Here: Multisensory Instruction: What You Need to Know

How about multi-sensory in physical education to teach other content areas? Take a look at my colleague’s approach to teaching Skeletal Anatomy to PreK students!

Multi-Sensory Instruction in PreK with Coach Chris Tolbert

Happy Teaching! Go make some Multi-Sensory Magic!